21 Common Mushrooms in Georgia: Edible & Poisonous


Mushroom hunting is a popular activity in Georgia, with a variety of both edible and poisonous mushrooms growing in its forests and meadows.

While mushroom identification can be difficult, it is important to take identification seriously to avoid consuming poisonous varieties.

In this article, we will explore some common mushrooms found in Georgia, both edible and poisonous, and provide tips for safe mushroom hunting.

Key Takeaways:

  • Georgia is home to a variety of both edible and poisonous mushrooms.
  • Some common edible mushrooms found in Georgia include golden chanterelles, oyster mushrooms, morels, and truffles.
  • Some common poisonous mushrooms found in Georgia include the false morel, fly agaric, and death cap mushrooms.
  • Mushroom identification can be difficult and should be done with caution. It is recommended to consult with an expert or use a reliable field guide when identifying mushrooms.
  • When mushroom hunting, it is important to use caution and take identification seriously. Always err on the side of caution and not consume a mushroom if you are unsure of its identification.
  • Cook mushrooms thoroughly before consuming them, even if they are edible.
  • Joining a mushroom club or society can be a great resource for novice and experienced foragers alike.

Edible Mushrooms in Georgia

Mushrooms in Georgia

Georgia is a haven for mushroom enthusiasts, with a wide variety of edible mushrooms growing in its forests and meadows.

Here are some of the most popular edible mushrooms found in the state:

  • Golden Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius): These bright orange mushrooms are highly sought after for their rich, nutty flavor. They can be found in both hardwood and coniferous forests.
  • Old-Man-of-the-Woods (Strobilomyces floccopus): Also known as the “woolly cap,” these mushrooms have a unique texture and a mild, earthy flavor. They are often found near pine trees.
  • Wood-Ear (Auricularia auricula-judae): These small, jelly-like mushrooms are commonly used in Asian cuisine. They have a subtle flavor and a slightly crunchy texture when cooked.
  • Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus): Named for their resemblance to oysters, these mushrooms have a delicate flavor and a velvety texture. They can be found growing on dead or dying trees.
  • Morel Mushroom (Morchella spp.): Morels are highly prized for their rich, earthy flavor and distinctive appearance. They can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, meadows, and even urban areas.
  • Puffball Mushroom (Calvatia gigantea): These large, round mushrooms are known for their ability to “puff” out a cloud of spores when mature. They have a mild, nutty flavor and a spongy texture.
  • Chicken of the Woods (Laetiporus sulphureus): This bright orange mushroom has a texture and flavor similar to chicken when cooked. It can be found growing on the trunks of living or dead trees.
  • Lion’s Mane (Hericium erinaceus): Also known as the “pom-pom mushroom,” this unique fungus has a seafood-like flavor and a stringy, meaty texture. It can be found growing on hardwood trees.
  • Truffles (Tuber spp.): Truffles are highly prized for their intense, earthy flavor and aroma. They are usually found underground, near the roots of certain trees, and are often located with the help of trained dogs or pigs.
  • Black Trumpet (Craterellus fallax): These small, trumpet-shaped mushrooms have a rich, smoky flavor and a slightly chewy texture. They can be found growing in hardwood forests.
  • Hedgehog Mushroom (Hydnum repandum): Named for the spiky “teeth” on the underside of their caps, hedgehog mushrooms have a mild, nutty flavor and a firm, meaty texture. They can be found in both coniferous and hardwood forests.

Poisonous Mushrooms in Georgia

Mushrooms in Georgia

While Georgia is home to many delicious edible mushrooms, it also has its fair share of poisonous varieties.

Here are some of the most common poisonous mushrooms found in the state:

  • False Morel Mushroom (Gyromitra esculenta): This mushroom is often mistaken for a true morel but is actually highly toxic. It has a wrinkled, brain-like appearance and a distinctive, meaty odor.
  • Liberty Cap Mushroom (Psilocybe semilanceata): These small, brown mushrooms contain the hallucinogenic compound psilocybin and should not be consumed. They are often found in grassy areas, such as meadows and pastures.
  • Fly Agaric Mushroom (Amanita muscaria): This iconic red and white mushroom is highly toxic and can cause hallucinations, delirium, and in some cases, death. It is often found near birch and pine trees.
  • Banded Mottlegill (Panaeolus acuminatus): This small, brown mushroom is often found in lawns and gardens and is highly toxic. It can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested.
  • Haymaker Mushroom (Panaeolus foenisecii): Although not highly toxic, this mushroom can cause gastrointestinal upset if consumed. It is often found in grassy areas, such as lawns and meadows.
  • Destroying Angel Mushroom (Amanita virosa): This deadly mushroom is often mistaken for an edible variety, such as a button mushroom or a puffball. It can cause severe liver and kidney damage, and in some cases, death.
  • Death Cap Mushroom (Amanita phalloides): Another highly toxic mushroom, the death cap is responsible for the majority of mushroom-related deaths worldwide. It closely resembles several edible mushroom species, making it particularly dangerous.
  • Panther Cap Mushroom (Amanita pantherina): This mushroom is similar in appearance to the fly agaric but is less toxic. However, it can still cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms if consumed.
  • Fool’s Mushroom (Amanita verna): Also known as the “destroying angel,” this mushroom is one of the most deadly.
  • Jack-O-Lantern Mushroom (Omphalotus illudens): This mushroom is highly toxic and can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms if consumed. It is often found growing in clusters on dead wood and is bright orange in color.

Mushroom Identification and Safety

Mushroom identification can be a challenging task, even for experienced foragers.

It is important to use caution when identifying and consuming mushrooms, as many poisonous varieties closely resemble edible ones.

Here are some tips for safe mushroom hunting:

  • Consult a field guide: A reliable field guide is an essential tool for mushroom identification. Look for a guide that is specific to your region and includes detailed descriptions and photographs of both edible and poisonous mushrooms.
  • Learn the basics: Familiarize yourself with the basic anatomy of mushrooms, including cap shape, gill structure, and spore color. This will help you narrow down your identification options.
  • Join a club: Mushroom clubs and societies are a great resource for novice and experienced foragers alike. They often offer guided forays, educational programs, and opportunities to connect with other mushroom enthusiasts.
  • Use caution: When in doubt, it is best to err on the side of caution and not consume a mushroom. Some poisonous varieties can cause severe illness or even death, so it is important to take identification seriously.
  • Start small: If you are new to mushroom hunting, start with a few easy-to-identify varieties, such as morels or chanterelles. As you gain experience, you can expand your repertoire to include more challenging species.
  • Cook thoroughly: Even edible mushrooms can cause gastrointestinal upset if not cooked properly. Always cook mushrooms thoroughly before consuming them.

Before You Go

I have some more articles on mushrooms in Georgia you can check out.

I’ll leave links to them below.

Types Of Red Mushrooms In Georgia

Types Of White Mushrooms In Georgia

Types Of Orange Mushrooms In Georgia

Blog Roll

Star Mushroom Farms