12 Common Mushrooms In Minnesota


As autumn approaches, so do mushroom hunting seasons in Minnesota. Many people enjoy picking wild mushrooms and cooking them.

In this article, we are going to go over 12 common mushrooms in Minnesota and their characteristic features. We hope that this article will help you to get more interested in wild mushrooms and start planning your mushroom hunting expeditions soon!

[Related Article: 9 Common Mushrooms In Mississippi]

1. Boletes

common mushrooms in minnesota

There are many different types of mushrooms that can be found in Minnesota, but one of the most common is the bolete mushroom. Boletes are a type of fungi that typically have a spore-bearing surface beneath their caps, and they can range in color from white to brown to red.

These mushrooms are often found growing on trees, stumps, or logs, and they are a favorite food source for many animals, including deer, mice, and voles.

Boletes are relatively easy to identify, but there are a few things you should look for before you start picking them. First, check to see if the mushroom has a spore-bearing surface beneath its cap – this is typically a sign that it is a bolete.

Second, take a close look at the mushroom’s stalk – if it is attached to the tree or log that it is growing on, it is probably a bolete. Finally, check the color of the mushroom – most boletes are some shade of brown, but they can also be white or red.

If you’re not sure whether or not a mushroom is a bolete, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and leave it alone.

If you do decide to pick some boletes, there are a few things you should keep in mind. First, only harvest mushrooms that are firmly attached to their substrate – avoid picking any that are loose or easily uprooted.

Second, cut the mushroom at its base rather than pulling it up by its stem. This will help reduce the chances of damaging the spore-bearing surface beneath the cap.

Finally, make sure you clean your mushrooms thoroughly before cooking or eating them – dirt and debris can cause stomach upset if ingested.

With these tips in mind, go out and enjoy hunting for some delicious boletes!

2. Morels

common mushrooms in minnesota

Morels are one of the most common mushrooms in Minnesota. These mushrooms can be found in woods, fields, and even your own backyard!

Morels are a type of edible fungi that have a spongy, honeycomb-like appearance. Morels are usually dark brown or black, but can also be white or tan.

Morels are a type of edible fungi that have a spongy, honeycomb-like appearance. Morels are usually dark brown or black, but can also be white or tan.

These mushrooms can be found in woods, fields, and even your own backyard! Morels are a delicious addition to any meal, and can be cooked in many different ways.

If you’re lucky enough to find some morels, make sure you cook them before eating them. Morels should never be eaten raw, as they can cause stomach upset.

When cooking morels, simply sautee them in butter or olive oil until they’re golden brown. Serve them as a side dish or add them to your favorite recipe!

3. Puffballs

common mushrooms in minnesota

Puffballs are one of the most common mushrooms in Minnesota. They typically grow in woods, fields, and lawns, and can often be found near trees or stumps.

Puffballs range in color from white to tan, and have a round shape with a smooth surface. When they mature, puffballs develop a stalk and release spores from the top.

Puffballs are edible when they are young and still white inside. However, once they mature and turn brown or yellow, they become poisonous. If you’re not sure whether a puffball is safe to eat, it’s best to err on the side of caution and avoid it altogether.

If you do decide to eat a puffball, cook it thoroughly before consuming. Some people also recommend removing the skin, as it can be tough to digest.

Puffballs can be boiled, baked, or fried – just make sure they’re cooked through before you eat them!

4. Inky Caps

common mushrooms in minnesota

There are many different types of mushrooms that can be found in Minnesota, but the Inky Cap is one of the most common. This mushroom gets its name from the fact that the top of the cap is black and ink-like.

The Inky Cap is usually found in wooded areas and often grows in clusters. While they are edible, they are not considered to be a desirable mushroom because of their taste.

The Inky Cap is a type of decomposer mushroom, which means that it helps to break down dead leaves and other organic matter. This is an important role in the ecosystem, as it helps to recycle nutrients back into the soil.

The Inky Cap is just one of many different types of mushrooms that can be found in Minnesota woods.

5. Velvet Foot

Velvet Foot mushrooms are one of the most common mushrooms found in Minnesota. These mushrooms have a velvety texture and a dark brown color. They are often found in woods or fields, and they grow best in shady areas.

Velvet Foot mushrooms are a good source of protein and vitamins, and they can be cooked in many different ways. They can be sauteed, grilled, or even eaten raw.

When choosing Velvet Foot mushrooms, look for ones that are firm and free of blemishes. Avoid any mushrooms that are soft or have spots on them.

If you’re looking for a delicious and healthy mushroom to add to your next meal, try Velvet Foot mushrooms! You won’t be disappointed.

6. Honey Mushroom

common mushrooms in minnesota

The Honey Mushroom is one of the most common mushrooms in Minnesota. This mushroom gets its name from its golden color and sweet taste.

While it is edible, the Honey Mushroom is not considered to be one of the best-tasting mushrooms. It is often used in soups and stews because of its bland flavor.

7. Oyster Mushroom

common mushrooms in minnesota

Oyster mushrooms are one of the most common mushrooms in Minnesota. They can be found growing on dead or dying trees, stumps, and logs. Oyster mushrooms are easy to identify because of their unique shape and color.

The caps of these mushrooms are usually white, gray, or brownish-yellow. The edges of the caps are often scalloped or ruffled. The stems of oyster mushrooms are very short and typically the same color as the cap.

Oyster mushrooms are a good choice for beginners because they are easy to identify and they are not poisonous. These mushrooms can be eaten raw, cooked, or pickled.

They have a mild flavor that is slightly sweet or nutty. When cooked, oyster mushrooms become tender and have a texture similar to that of seafood.

8. Amanita

common mushrooms in minnesota

Amanita is a genus of mushrooms that includes some of the most poisonous mushrooms in the world. The most famous member of this genus is the fly agaric, which is well-known for its red cap with white spots.

Amanitas are found in many parts of the world, including Minnesota.

While some amanitas are edible, others are highly poisonous. The toxin in these mushrooms can cause serious illness or death. If you’re not sure whether a mushroom is safe to eat, it’s best to err on the side of caution and avoid it altogether.

9. Deadly Galerina

common mushrooms in minnesota

Don’t let the name fool you, the Deadly Galerina is one of the most common mushrooms in Minnesota – and it’s also one of the most poisonous. While it may not be deadly if consumed in small quantities, it can still cause serious illness or even death.

The best way to avoid this mushroom is to simply know what it looks like and avoid it altogether.

The Deadly Galerina is a small, brown mushroom that typically grows in clusters on decaying wood. It has a smooth cap with gills that run down the stem.

While it may look innocuous, this mushroom is actually highly poisonous. If consumed, it can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps. In large quantities, it can even lead to liver failure and death.

If you come across a Deadly Galerina mushroom, the best thing to do is to leave it alone. Don’t touch it or consume it in any way.

10. False Parasol

The False Parasol is a common mushroom in Minnesota that is known to be poisonous. This mushroom gets its name from its resemblance to a parasol, or umbrella.

The False Parasol can be found growing in wooded areas, and often appears after a heavy rain. This mushroom is white or light grey in color, and has a rounded top with gills on the underside. The False Parasol can grow to be up to eight inches in diameter.

While the False Parasol may look harmless, it is actually poisonous and should not be consumed. If ingested, this mushroom can cause gastrointestinal upset, vomiting, and diarrhea.

In severe cases, the False Parasol can cause liver damage. If you come into contact with this mushroom, it is important to wash your hands thoroughly and avoid touching your face or eyes.

11. False Morels

False morels are one of the most common mushrooms in Minnesota, and they’re also one of the most poisonous. These mushrooms can easily be mistaken for edible morels, but there are some key differences to look out for.

False morels have a brain-like or sponge-like appearance, while true morels are honeycomb-like. False morels are also hollow, while true morels are solid.

And finally, false morels are attached to the stem at the top, while true morels are attached at the bottom.

If you’re not sure whether a mushroom is a false morel or not, it’s best to err on the side of caution and avoid eating it. These mushrooms can cause serious gastrointestinal distress and even death if consumed.

If you think you may have eaten a false morel, seek medical attention immediately.

12. Yellow Stainer

The yellow stainer is a common mushroom found in Minnesota that is poisonous. This mushroom gets its name from the fact that it can stain your skin and clothes yellow if you come into contact with it.

The best way to avoid coming into contact with this mushroom is to simply avoid touching it or picking it up.

If you do come into contact with the yellow stainer, the best thing to do is to immediately wash the affected area with soap and water. You should also avoid handling any food with the affected area as the toxins in the mushroom can transfer to whatever you’re touching.

In severe cases, contact with the yellow stainer can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s important to seek medical attention immediately.

While the yellow stainer is certainly a dangerous mushroom, it’s important to remember that not all mushrooms are poisonous. In fact, many mushrooms are edible and can be a delicious addition to your meal.

However, if you’re ever unsure about a mushroom, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and avoid eating it.

Conclusion

There are a variety of mushrooms that are common in Minnesota. Some are safe to eat while others are poisonous. When in doubt, it is best to consult a professional before consuming any mushroom.

This blog post has outlined 12 common mushrooms in Minnesota, so you can be prepared the next time you go mushroom hunting!

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